If Nobody in Your Area Cares about Yelp, Should You Still Bother Getting Reviews There?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/crouch/5965207074/

“My customers don’t care about Yelp.  Nobody around here cares about Yelp.  Why should I even try to get reviews there?”

That’s a valid concern of business owners in most of the US – and in most of the world.  Yelp, the Billion Dollar Bully, makes itself hard to avoid and even harder to like.  The site is only powerful because of all the reviews.  They’re its lifeblood.  So why on earth would you want to ask your hard-earned customers to review you there – when they probably don’t value it any more than you do?

A few reasons to hold your nose and work to get at least a few good reviews on Yelp:

1. Even people who don’t give a rip about Yelp still see your average rating in the search results when they Google you by name. They can tell that it’s a review site, even though they may not care that the review site is Yelp.  If nothing else, it’s a voice in the chorus.

2.  Yelp feeds reviews to Apple Maps, Bing Places, and Yahoo Local. So if you have a 1-star or a 5-star average on Yelp, that’s what people who check out your listings on those 3 local search engines will see.

3.  It’s worth having a couple positive reviews on Yelp just in case someone does a hatchet job on you there. It’s a defensive move, at the very least.  The time to start trying to get good reviews is not when you’re in a hole.

4.  Even though most people in the great State of _____ have the good sense not to care much about Yelp, some small segment of the population may pay attention to it. Throw them a bone.

5.  Maybe Yelp will broaden its appeal one day.

6.  It’s not an all-or-nothing proposition. Yelp doesn’t need to become your main squeeze, or a major time-commitment.  The goal is to get at least a couple good reviews on the board.

7.  It’s great practice for you, in the name of getting dialed-in on your review strategy. You’ll get a little better at knowing whom to ask, when to ask, how to ask, etc.  If it proves too tough to get a given customer to review you on Yelp, ask him or her to review you somewhere else instead.

How to get at least a few reviews on Yelp?  These posts may help:

How to Bulk-Identify Prime Yelp Reviewers with Yelp’s “Find Friends” Feature in 7 Easy Steps – me

20+ Depressing Observations about Yelp Reviews – me

8 Reasons Why Your Business Should Use Yelp’s Check-In Offers – Joy Hawkins

3 Next-Level Yelp Tricks for Business Owners – Brian Patterson

Do people in your area give a hoot about Yelp?  How do you approach it?

Leave a comment!

P.S.  Thanks to Lisa Moon of Paper Moon Painting for asking me a thought-provoking question last year that made me want to write about this.

Think One .edu Link Will Move the SEO Needle?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/frnetz/26024570852/

I often tell clients that they’ll only benefit from a pile of good, relevant links – not necessarily from any single backlink.  Growing your rankings, traffic, and business isn’t quite as simple as getting that one unicorn link.

Some business owners don’t like to hear that.  “Well, my competitor who’s outranking me only has 1 good link,” or, “Are you telling me we busted our hump to get a ‘great link’ that won’t clearly help us?”

It’s complicated.  On the one hand, without at least some good links you won’t be competitive, and Google surely values some more than others (80/20 rule).  On the other hand, you can’t say exactly how much Google values a specific link, or if and when it starts “paying off.”  That’s why people who use a single strategy – like “scholarship link-building” – as their only way to earn good links are in for a disappointment, in my experience.

As I often do, I decided it was time for a little experiment.

My site has tons of authoritative links, but until recently it didn’t have one from a .edu domain.  I think that’s because my audience consists mainly of business owners and other SEOs and marketers.  Not as many professors.

In a roundabout way, I found that a school affiliated with my alma mater wanted donations for a robotics competition between the kids.

The Boston University Academy sure had an inviting “Sponsors” page on BU.edu, with a “follow” image link for each sponsor.

BU Academy isn’t the one shaking me down for money every month, and I thought their robotics competition sounded like a good cause, so I was glad to donate a few bucks – and in the name of SEO (pseudo)science, no less.

I reached out to the coordinator, mailed in my check, and a few days later got my logo/link down near the bottom of the page, where all the cool businesses hang out.

What happened then?

Did my traffic “EXPLODE!” or “SKYROCKET!!” (a la Warrior Forum infoproduct)?

Not that I noticed.  Traffic stayed pretty much stayed the same after getting that nice .edu link.

Now, as with most experiments, there may have been some “noise” in this one.  To wit:

1.  Local Visibility System already had a heavy-duty link profile, and got even more good ones after the .edu. I suppose it’s possible there would have been a more-noticeable effect if I hadn’t had many or any good links before the .edu, or didn’t continue to get them afterwards.

2.  Of course, there is other dust flying. For instance, the highest peaks in my traffic come when I do a blog post that I announce to the people on my email list.  Of course, it often is the case that a business has other marketing activities going on.

3.  I’m not a “local” business. Boston University is relevant to Boston, and I live near Boston, but most of my traffic comes from all over the place.  Perhaps ironically, I don’t give a hoot about my local rankings.  Maybe my local rankings benefited from the geographically-relevant .edu link, but the point is my numbers in Analytics don’t show a clear before-and-after.

4.  There was no anchor text. I got an image link (i.e. my logo was hyperlinked).

5.  The link went up only 3 months ago. Maybe it takes longer to notice a “pop,” but I’d have no way of attributing that to that one link, with everything else I’ve got swirling around.

I’m sure this isn’t the last word on “the potential payoff of one backlink,” of course.  Other people may have data that contradicts mine.  Maybe you have data that contradicts mine.  I’d love to hear.

Still, I feel more confident in saying (1) there isn’t necessarily any magic in a .edu link, and that (2) a great backlinks profile is more than the sum of its parts.

Do You Really Need to Clean up That Local Citation?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/donwest48/27214819893/

Local SEOs excel at nitpicking, trading in superstitions, and billing for busywork.  Nowhere is that more true than when it’s time to clean up local citations. You’ve got dozens (or hundreds) of local listings online, and not all of them have the correct business info.  You’ve heard it’s important to have correct and consistent info on […]

[Continue reading…]

3rd Edition of Free Guide to Effective Local SEO

It’s been 3 years since I released the 2nd edition of my free guide to local SEO. Much has changed in Google and in the rest of the local-search “ecosystem” since then.  Edition 2 still can help you, but it’s developed a casu marzu -like crust. I’ve finally come out with the 3rd edition.  It’s […]

[Continue reading…]

Distance to Business Now Showing in Google’s Local Knowledge Panel

Google a business by name and you’ll see something new in the knowledge panel on the right: your distance to the business, from the number of miles, down to the number of feet if you’re real close. I didn’t see this even earlier today.  The above screenshot is from desktop, but clearly it’s another “mobile-first” update.  It […]

[Continue reading…]

Cancelled Moz Local: How Many Listings Still Stand?

Moz Local is a great tool.  I use it for a number of my clients, and often suggest it to others.  Having correct listings on the “local” sites that matter is a crucial one-time step if you want to improve your local rankings. No tool is a silver bullet to create or fix all your listings.  […]

[Continue reading…]

How Much Do You Know about Local Reviews? Take This Quiz

Like it or not, your business hinges on your reputation (or soon will).  Your online reviews are an ever-growing part of your reputation – and sometimes they’re one and the same.  But getting happy customers / clients / patients to speak up is hard. There’s much more to it than just, “Run a good business […]

[Continue reading…]

Template for Creating Knockout City-Page Content for Local SEO

https://www.flickr.com/photos/theogeo/1118335116/

Most “city pages” stink more than a pig farmer’s overalls.  Even if they rank well, they usually don’t compel anyone to call.  The content is stuffed with the name of the city, but it’s boilerplate otherwise.  To would-be customers it’s just lip service from a company that seems desperate for business. Every page is the […]

[Continue reading…]

Local SEO for State-Level Search Terms

A good local SEO effort gets you some rankings and customers in your city.  A great effort might get you results from some adjoining cities, too.  But few local SEO campaigns result in new business from across an entire state. Even rarer is for someone in this industry to write about state-level searches.  There’s this great piece by […]

[Continue reading…]

Yelp Now Showing Review Summaries on Business Pages

If your business has more than about 10 Yelp reviews, Yelp now will try to summarize them in 2-3 sentence-long blurbs at the top of your page. This appears to be new.  At least for Yelp.  Google’s been showing the same kinds of summaries for over 2 1/2 years. Unlike with Google’s review-sentiment summaries, Yelp […]

[Continue reading…]