How NOT to Structure Your URLs for Local Rankings

Feast your eyes:

http://www.nickortizlaw.com/social-security-disability-and-ssi-claims/the-four-administrative-levels-of-review-in-a-social-security-disability-claim/appeals-council/what-happens-when-you-request-review-of-an-administrative-law-judges-hearing-decision/

Problem 1: 3 subdirectories (in this case, parent pages):

/social-security-disability-and-ssi-claims

/the-four-administrative-levels-of-review-in-a-social-security-disability-claim

/appeals-council

 

Problem 2:  The page name:

what-happens-when-you-request-review-of-an-administrative-law-judges-hearing-decision

Yep.  13 words.

 

Problem 3:  Most of the URL won’t show in the SERPs.

 

Problem 4.  Even if there was a gun pointed at your head, you couldn’t tell someone over the phone how to go directly to the page:

Go to NickOrtizlaw.com slash social dash security dash disability dash and dash ssi dash claims – yes, that’s “claims” with an “S” – slash THE dash four dash administrative…

 

Problem 5.  Your breadcrumbs might not improve the user-experience much:

 

The consequences?

Google won’t re-crawl your page until you’re wearing Depends.

And you know which page(s) will get penalized first, if and when Google revisits the question of how much on-page “optimization” is too much.

Keep it simple.  1 or at most 2 subdirectories.  Short names for those.  Short names for your pages, too.

Hat tip to Darren Shaw for telling me about that page and other good ones.