Checklist for Keeping Google+ Reviews out of the Filter

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Don’t you hate it when your customers’ Google+ reviews get devoured by the hungry “anti-spam” filter?

After all, all you’re doing is asking your customers in a polite and un-pushy way to leave some honest feedback on your business’s Google+Local listing.

They say “No problem,” they go to write you a review…and nothing happens.  They’re frustrated, you’re frustrated, and your reviews end up swimming with the fishes.

It shouldn’t be this way, but it is.  Getting reviews takes some finesse.

I’ve had a lot of success helping my clients and others get the results of their karma, in the form of Google reviews.

That’s why I’ve put together a quick checklist of what are, in my experience, the best ways to prevent customers’ reviews from getting gobbled by Google’s filters.  It’s a quick reference for business owner and local SEO-er alike.

Here you go:
(click to download PDF)

 

Obviously, there’s never any guarantee that your customers’ reviews won’t get filtered.  But if you’re following those best-practices, you’re probably not trying to spam or game the system in any way, and you should end up with the reviews you deserve.

(By the way, if you want even more info, check out my monstrous complete guide to Google+ reviews.)

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Comments

  1. Great checklist of best practices – thank you for sharing!

  2. Thanks for the information. This Google Filter is quite tricky!

  3. Phil:

    Why is it such a no-no to give people a direct link to your Google+ Local page to leave a review? If you use a review system like Mike and Don’s FiveStarReviews, they provide direct links to the page so I have to believe it’s not that big of a deal. What’s your take on this issue today?

    Travis Van Slooten

Trackbacks

  1. [...] The variety – the fact that it has review buttons for 37 different sites, and lets you create a custom link (in case there’s a different site you want reviews on).  As I explained during my talk at SMX West, giving customers choices and not shoehorning them into one review site or another is the best way to avoid having your reviews get filtered. [...]

  2. [...] A few of the factors that matter to the “review filter” seem to be: whether customers try to post reviews at an unnatural pace, how many reviews a given person has written previously, the wording of the review, and the user’s location (IP address).  We don’t know exactly what factors Google’s review filters consider, or which matter the most.  But the main thing you need to know is that Google has the facts on your business’s review-gathering activity and each customer’s review-posting behavior – and Google can take all of it into account when deciding which reviews to toss versus keep.  (For more on how to keep your reviews out of the filter, see my checklist.) [...]

  3. [...] study the review itself and see if you can discern anything that might have tripped the filter to begin with, and see if you can glean any insights that [...]

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